Tick-Borne Encephalitis Vaccination

Tick-borne encephalitis is a viral infection usually transmitted through the bite of an infected tick. The disease occurs in parts of Central, Northern and Eastern Europe, Siberia and parts of Asia. 

Vaccination is available for those travellers intending to visit rural risk areas, or whose occupation may put them at higher risk.

 

Book a Tick-Borne Encephalitis Vaccination

By booking an appointment with a REMEDI HEALTH clinician we can ensure that we can advise appropriately and prescribe safely for optimum protection.

Keeping healthy when travelling goes beyond having the recommended vaccines before your trip. It’s about your broader health protection needs and may involve antimalarials and other acute treatments should you become unwell. We can also advise and provide these.

To book this service, please click the button below and choose a date and time that suits you.

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Safe, private clinic

Our beautiful award-winning clinic is in the centre of Winchester and we look forward to welcoming you. Keeping you and others safe is our priority and so if you are unwell, please let us know in advance and we will make appropriate arrangements.

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Trained clinicians

Your appointment will be with a highly trained clinician in one of our private consultation rooms at our clinic in Winchester. We will advise you to ensure that you only receive treatment that is appropriate so you are protected and safe.

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Private Pharmacy

We operate within a registered private pharmacy which means that we can discuss and provide any required treatments, tests or referrals as appropriate. You can also be assured that we work within a strict governance framework.

About this appointment

During your appointment our trained clinician will discuss health history and any factors which may affect the use of a vaccine. This will ensure that any vaccine provided is appropriate and safe.

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About Tick-Borne Encephalitis

Tick-borne encephalitis is a viral infection usually transmitted through the bite of an infected tick. The disease occurs in parts of central, northern and Eastern Europe, Siberia and parts of Asia. Ticks are found on forest fringes within adjacent grassland, forest glades, riverside meadows and marshland, forest plantations with brushwood and shrubbery. Ticks can also be found in parks and gardens.

Travellers to areas where it occurs may be at risk when walking, camping or working in woodland. In Europe, early spring through to late autumn are generally higher risk, but seasons vary according to location. 

Typically, the disease occurs in two stages: a mild flu-like illness and a potentially serious infection of the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). The disease is rarely fatal in Europe: however in Asia it can be fatal in up to 20 percent of cases. Long-term neurological complications are common.

Travellers should:

  • Avoid known heavily tick-infested areas of forest and woodland during the spring, summer and autumn where possible
  • Practise bite avoidance methods: for example wear appropriate clothing and use effective insect repellents
  • Check the body for ticks regularly. The larval forms of Ixodes ticks are tiny and difficult to see
  • Remove ticks as soon as possible by using a pair of fine tipped tweezers or tick remover
  • Avoid consumption of unpasteurised dairy products in areas of risk (a potential route of transmission)
  • Seek advice from a medical practitioner if any signs of illness occur within 28 days of a tick bite.

A vaccine is available for those travellers intending to visit rural risk areas, or whose occupation may put them at higher risk.

About the Tick-Borne Encephalitis Vaccine

The vaccine should be considered for:

  • All persons living in risk areas
  • Those at occupational risk in risk areas: farmers, forestry workers, soldiers
  • Travellers at risk of disease

There are two vaccines available, one for under 16 years of age, and one for people 16 and over. 

The schedule is 3 doses on days 0, between 1 and 3 months, and 5 to 12 months after the second dose. The 2nd dose can be given 2 weeks after the 1st dose in an accelerated schedule.

After the first two doses, sufficient protection can be expected for the on-going tick season (protection rate over 90 percent after the second dose).

First booster should be no more than 3 years after 3rd dose. After this, boosters may be given at 5 year intervals if at risk. For those aged 60 or older, the booster should be given at 3 year intervals.

Can we help you?

Our team are standing by to help you with any questions or queries that you may have. We can advise you on the best test, product or service for your requirements.